Tag Archives: Fiction Advocate

The Hole Love

FICTION ADVOCATE HAS POSTED Dan Pribble’s review of Nicholson Baker’s “House of Holes,” in which Baker challenges Ludacris as the modern world’s preeminent laureate of getting freaky.

Neither the book nor the review seem like they would be safe for reading out loud at work.

Presented with no explanation and no guile, the House is not one structure but a multi-themed adult amusement park consisting of mountains, forests, bodies of water and many, many attractions dedicated to the unbridled and broadly envisioned pursuit of sexual pleasure. We are made privy to the existence of Masturboats, pussy-boarding, penis trees, pornsucker ships flown by pussypilots arranged in pornsucker squadrons, and cross-crotchal interplasmic transfers, which are more or less exactly what they sound like. Guests can visit the Hall of Penises, the Garden of Wholesome Delightful Fuckers, Groanrooms, the Porndecahedron or the headless bedrooms (not as bad as they sound). “Cock” and “pussy,” already in heavy rotation, understandably give way to more outlandish monikers such as Lincoln Stiffins, spunk pipe, manjig and Malcolm Gladwell; or else bitchgroove, twizzled riddler, lettuce patch and fuckfountain.

Read the full review.

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Harbach. So Hot Right Now. Harbach.

The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
For those who enjoy baseball and disappointment, i.e. Mets fans; may also dull pain for Braves and Sox fans
Status: Bookstores will trade it to you for money.

OVER AT FICTION ADVOCATE, Paul Gasbarra takes on the latest and most hyped book to emerge from the n+1 brain trust. The novel is so hot right now it already has its own authorized biography, Vanity Fair’s e-book about how, at a time when America needed a hero, a broke writer named Chad Harbach stunned everyone and got a major payout to put “The Art of Fielding” into print.

With the presence of teams like the Tampa Bay Rays — the suburban strip mall of baseball franchises — assured in the playoffs this year, “Fielding” may be your best bet for diamond action in the coming month. But there is definitely more to the book than baseball.

But the writer still has ample opportunity to finesse the action through revision. In the split second it takes to throw a ball, there can be no deliberation. In fact, Skrimshander’s failures on the field stem directly from his thinking versus acting. It’s interesting to note that we expect much from our authors because they get an opportunity to edit and hone their works, but we expect even more excellence from athletes, who get no opportunity for revision.

Read the full review.

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The Alan Rickman of American Letters

Arguably by Christopher Hitchens
There’s more to this guy than the assertion that women aren’t funny
Status: Too big to mail

MY THOUGHTS ON “ARGUABLY,” the latest from Christopher Hitchens, are now posted over at Fiction Advocate. Here’s a quick sample:

Erudition is what has always allowed us to forgive Hitchens his trespasses, or at least overlook them – much the way, as he writes, quite well, of Isaac Newton, “one has to admire someone who could dare to be wrong in such a beautiful way.” His British inflections don’t hurt either. Hitchens was naturalized as an American citizen in 2007 – in a “fuck off” to critics of his support for the Bush wars, the swearing-in was performed by Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff – but he can still effectively open a piece of professional journalism with a sentence containing the words “daresay” and “overmuch.” And it actually serves as a functional insult when he coronates Prince Charles the “Prince of Piffle.” That eloquence and sly British charm make Hitchens enjoyable even, or especially, when he plays the villain, hewing out a space for him as the Alan Rickman of American letters.

Read the full review.

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Fiction Advocate Review: The Curfew

The Curfew by Jesse BallAFTER SAYING SEVERAL KIND WORDS ABOUT IT, Brian over at the Fiction Advocate has kindly offered up for trade (or just for free) “The Curfew” by Jesse Ball. Ball is a young writer who has been making his way in the literature business over the last five or six years. If you’ve never heard of him, you’ve definitely heard of the places that have published him: The Paris Review, The Boston Review, New Republic, Oberon and Best American Poetry 2006.

Of “The Curfew,” Brian writes:

Ball’s writing is spare and often stunning. With its odd proverbs, anachronistic language, and strict manners, it resembles a sinister children’s fable… If the definition of experimental literature is that “its politics are its aesthetics and vice versa,” then The Curfew is a stirring example.

Read the full review.

Do you want to trade paperbacks?

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