Author Archives: Fiction Advocate

USSR for Only $8

Here is the $8 deal on PayPal.

vladimir-kozlov-copy

Hi friends!

We published a novel that’s hella popular on Amazon, but we’re earning almost no money from it, because Amazon sucks.

So we’ll make you a deal.

Buy the paperback edition of USSR: Diary of a Perestroika Kid by Vladimir Kozlov (trans. Andrea Gregovich) directly from us at PayPal, and you can have it for only $8.

This is the book that NPR strongly recommended as “a universal story about the petty humiliations and hard-won triumphs of youth.” You’ll be saving $10 off the Amazon price, and we’ll be earning more than Amazon will ever give us.

Don’t let the big guys win! Enjoy this “exquisitely detailed” novel about “urban decay in the shadow of the Iron Curtain” for only $8. Thanks for supporting small press publishing!

Our supply is limited. Get your $8 copy of USSR now.

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HITTING SHELVES #32: The Telling by Zoe Zolbrod

The Telling

The Telling by Zoe Zolbrod comes out today!

It’s the story of how the author stayed silent about her early childhood molestation, and the many kaleidoscopic ways she has come forward and told the story since then. This history of sexual abuse colors Zolbrod’s sexuality, her relationships with men, and her life as a mother and a feminist.

We asked the author one question.

How are you celebrating the publication of The Telling? Continue reading

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What We’re Reading – May 2016

The Last Samurai

The Last Samurai by Helen Dewitt: “Sibylla …finds herself trapped as a single mother after a misguided one-night stand. Lacking male role models for a fatherless boy, Sibylla turns to endless replays of Kurosawa’s masterpiece Seven Samurai. But Ludo is obsessed with the one thing he wants and doesn’t know: his father’s name.”

The Bricks That Built the Houses

The Bricks That Built the Houses by Kate Tempest: “Becky, Harry, and Leon are leaving London in a fourth-hand Ford with a suitcase full of stolen money, in a mess of tangled loyalties and impulses. Kate Tempest’s novel … captures the contemporary struggle of urban life, of young people seeking jobs or juggling jobs, harboring ambitions and making compromises.”

Allegheny Front

Allegheny Front by Matthew Neill Null: “Set in the author’s homeland of West Virginia, this panoramic collection of stories traces the people and animals who live in precarious balance in the mountains of Appalachia over a span of two hundred years, in a disappearing rural world.”

Also this month: We’ll interview Ann Friedman (!) and find out how Zoe Zolbrod is celebrating the publication of The Telling.

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HITTING SHELVES #31: Golden Delicious by Christopher Boucher

Golden Delicious

Golden Delicious by Christopher Boucher comes out today!

It’s the story of the town of Appleseed, Massachusetts, where words come alive and bump against reality in strange and surprising ways. As the narrator grows up, interacting with stories that grow out of the soil and sentences that people keep as pets, he watches the town’s economy fail and his family fall apart. This is Boucher’s follow-up to How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive, which we adored.

We asked the author one question.

How are you celebrating the publication of Golden Delicious? Continue reading

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What We’re Reading – April 2016

The Red Parts

The Red Parts by Maggie Nelson:The Red Parts is a memoir, an account of a trial, and a provocative essay that interrogates the American obsession with violence and missing white women, and that scrupulously explores the nature of grief, justice, and empathy.”

Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings

Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings by Stephen O’Connor: “A debut novel about Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings, in whose story the conflict between the American ideal of equality and the realities of slavery and racism played out in the most tragic of terms.”

The Bed Moved

The Bed Moved by Rebecca Schiff: “The audacious, savagely funny debut of a writer of razor-sharp wit and surprising tenderness: a collection of stories that gives us a fresh take on adolescence, death, sex; on being Jewish-ish; and on finding one’s way as a young woman in the world.”

Also this month: We’ll interview Meghan Daum and review the Argentine writer Robert Arlt.

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Q&A with Minsoo Kang, Translator of The Story of Hong Gildong

The Story of Hong Gildong

Five hundred years ago there was a bandit in Korea named Hong Gildong. His life inspired a story that has been told countless times since then–the story of a magical boy who joins a group of bandits and becomes their king. To celebrate the new English translation of The Story of Hong Gildong, we asked Minsoo Kang a few questions.

When did you first encounter the story of Hong Gildong?

The figure of Hong Gildong is so ubiquitous in modern Korean culture that anyone who grew up in the country would be familiar with the hero as a part of his or her childhood memory. So I cannot pinpoint when exactly I first encountered him, in the same way as it would be impossible for most Americans to remember when exactly they first discovered Superman or Batman. His story is indeed so well known that most Koreans can recite Hong Gildong’s lament at his condition of being an illegitimate child, how he cannot even “address his father as Father and older brother as Brother.” Even here in the United States, I am rather delighted whenever I mention my translation project to Korean-Americans and they respond by saying “Hong Gildong! My childhood hero!” Continue reading

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