Author Archives: Fiction Advocate

What People Are Saying About Eyes on the Island

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We recently published Frank Reddy’s debut novel, Eyes on the Island. Reviewers are loving it.

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“Frank Reddy’s debut blows readers off their feet. A gripping thriller.”

Creative Loafing

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“Captures the atmosphere of Savannah and the Georgia barrier islands, with their mysterious and otherworldly histories, in a way that anyone familiar with the area will recognize.”

The Book Fetish Blog

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“This is a damn good novel.”

Fig and Thistle

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Get Eyes on the Island for only $12 here!

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What We’re Reading – November 2016

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Swing Time by Zadie Smith: “Two brown girls dream of being dancers–but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, what constitutes a tribe, or makes a person truly free. It’s a close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten, either…”

memoirs-of-a-polar-bear

Memoirs of a Polar Bear by Yoko Tawada: “Three generations (grandmother, mother, son) of polar bears are famous as both circus performers and writers in East Germany: they are polar bears who move in human society, stars of the ring and of the literary world. Happy or sad, each bear writes a story, enjoying both celebrity and ‘the intimacy of being alone with my pen.’”

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Moonglow by Michael Chabon:Moonglow unfolds as the deathbed confession of a man the narrator refers to only as ‘my grandfather.’ It is a tale of madness, of war and adventure, of sex and marriage and desire, of existential doubt and model rocketry, of the shining aspirations and demonic underpinnings of American technological accomplishment at midcentury, and, above all, of the destructive impact—and the creative power—of keeping secrets and telling lies.”

Also this month: We’ll review Loner by Teddy Wayne, interview Elizabeth Greenwood, author of Playing Dead, and launch a new column (!) devoted to literature in translation.

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What We’re Reading – October 2016

future-sex

Future Sex by Emily Witt: “In Future Sex, Witt explores internet dating, internet pornography, polyamory, and other avant-garde sexual subcultures as sites of possibility. She observes her encounters with these scenes with a wry sense of humor, capturing them in all their strangeness, ridiculousness, and beauty. The result is an open-minded, honest account of the contemporary pursuit of connection and pleasure, and an inspiring new model of female sexuality–open, forgiving, and unafraid.”

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33 Revolutions by Canek Sánchez Guevara: “The hero of this mordant portrayal of life in contemporary Cuba is a black Cuban whose parents were enthusiastic supporters of the Castro Revolution. Every night he suffers from Kafkaesque nightmares in which he is arrested and tried for unknown crimes. His disappointment and delusion grow until a day comes when he declares his unwillingness to become an informer, and his real troubles begin.”

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Him, Me, Muhammad Ali by Randa Jarrar: “Award-winning novelist Randa Jarrar’s new story collection moves seamlessly between realism and fable, history and the present, capturing the lives of Muslim women and men across myriad geographies and circumstances. With acerbic wit, deep tenderness, and boundless imagination, Jarrar brings to life a memorable cast of characters, many of them “accidental transients”—a term for migratory birds who have gone astray—seeking their circuitous routes back home.”

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Get Our New Book Before It’s Available Anywhere Else!

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Friends! Fellow readers! Fellow writers!

We want to thank you for supporting Fiction Advocate and small press publishing by giving you a chance to read Eyes on the Island by Frank Reddy before it’s available anywhere else. This is our newest release from Fiction Advocate Books. You won’t find it on Amazon until October. But you can get it right here, right now, with a $5 discount.

Eyes on the Island is already making headlines in Georgia, where the novel is set—check out the cover of the Gainesville Times below—and we think it’ll be a breakout hit. You like literary thrillers, right? You like deadly storms, and conspiracy theories, and priests who question their faith, and remote islands where people speak Gullah? Well, that’s what Eyes on the Island is all about.

Pulitzer Prize nominee Charles McNair says, “Frank Reddy is a revelation—this debut novel foreshadows a tidal wave of a career.”

We’re so excited to share Eyes on the Island with you that we’ll give you another Fiction Advocate book—the e-book edition of The Black Cat by J.M. Geever—when you buy this one. Just our way of saying THANK YOU for being a supporter of indie publishing!

Eyes on the Island by Frank Reddy

$12.95 +$3 shipping

EOTI Gainesville Times

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What We’re Reading – September 2016

Eve Out of Her Ruins - Ananda Devi

Eve Out of Her Ruins by Ananda Devi: “With brutal honesty and poetic urgency, Ananda Devi relates the tale of four young Mauritians trapped in their country’s endless cycle of fear and violence. Eve out of Her Ruins is a heartbreaking look at the dark corners of the island nation of Mauritius that tourists never see, and a poignant exploration of the construction of personhood at the margins of society.”

The Fortunes - Peter Ho Davies

The Fortunes by Peter Ho Davies: “Sly, funny, intelligent, and artfully structured, The Fortunes recasts American history through the lives of Chinese Americans and reimagines the multigenerational novel through the fractures of immigrant family experience.”

We Eat Our Own - Kea Wilson

We Eat Our Own by Kea Wilson: “When a nameless, struggling actor in 1970s New York gets the call that an enigmatic director wants him for an art film set in the Amazon, he doesn’t hesitate: he flies to South America, no questions asked. Inspired by a true story from the annals of 1970s Italian horror film, and told in dazzlingly precise prose,We Eat Our Own is a resounding literary debut, a thrilling journey behind the scenes of a shocking film and a thoughtful commentary on violence and its repercussions.”

Also this month: We’ll interview Virgie Tovar and talk about The Art of Waiting by Belle Boggs, Reputations by Juan Gabriel Vásquez, and Children of the New World by Alexander Weinstein.

And we’ll announce the novel that Fiction Advocate will be releasing soon…

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What We’re Reading – August 2016

The Fire This Time

The Fire This Time edited by Jesmyn Ward: “National Book Award–winner Jesmyn Ward takes James Baldwin’s 1963 examination of race in America, The Fire Next Time, as a jumping off point for this groundbreaking collection of essays and poems about race from the most important voices of her generation and our time.”

The Field of the Cloth of Gold

The Field of the Cloth of Gold by Magnus Mills: “Magnus Mills’s new novel takes its name from the site of a 1520 meeting between Henry VIII and Francis I of France, to improve relations between the countries as the Treaty of London deteriorated. It allegorically suggests a number of historical encounters on British soil: the coming of the Vikings, the coming of the Romans. But The Field of the Cloth of Gold sits firmly outside of time, a skillful and surreal fable dealing with ideas of ownership, empire, immigration, charisma, diplomacy, and bureaucracy.”

How-I-Became-a-North-Korean-by-Krys-Lee-on-BookDragon-via-LJ

How I Became a North Korean by Krys Lee: “Yongju is an accomplished student from one of North Korea’s most prominent families. Jangmi, on the other hand, has had to fend for herself since childhood, most recently by smuggling goods across the border. Then there is Danny, a Chinese-American teenager whose quirks and precocious intelligence have long made him an outcast in his California high school. These three disparate lives converge when they flee their homes, finding themselves in a small Chinese town just across the river from North Korea.”

Also this month: We’ll talk about Kingdom of Speech by Tom Wolfe, Bad Faith by Theodore Wheeler, The Humorless Ladies of Border Control by Franz Nicolay, and Girl & Flame by Melissa Reddish.

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